Risk Curiosity!

“Once we believe in ourselves, we can risk curiosity, wonder, spontaneous delight, or any experience that reveals the human spirit.”

― e.e. cummings

We can risk curiosity!  Isn’t that a wonderful way to put it?

To risk curiosity, we have to believe in ourselves, have faith in ourselves.  And for me, when I am living by The Seven Tools of Transformation, curiosity is an essential ingredient.

When I am looking for inspiration to ignite my curiosity, I go visit my friend my friend Becki Ginsberg Saltzman’s website, Living Curiously.

Becki works with people who want to learn to use curiosity strategically to make better decisions, generate new ideas, and live more fulfilling and adventurous lives.

Becki is not the only one who recommends risking curiosity.  In her talk on Super Soul Sunday, Elizabeth Gilbert suggests taking passion off the table and pursuing curiosity.  So many of us believe we should always be following our passion, and sometimes that gets us stuck. What is my passion? we ask.  But if we get quiet and ask ourselves what we feel curious about, sometimes that can lead us to places we never imagined.

Please take the time to watch this short video of Elizabeth Gilbert, and think about what you are curious about.

 

 

I’d love to hear about what you are curious about today. And as always, thanks for taking the time to visit, I appreciate it.

 

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When One Door Closes . . .

“When one door closes, another opens; but we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened for us.”

– Alexander Graham Bell


In an excellent article from Positive Psychology Program, seven concepts are explored for increasing a person’s feeling of well-being. It’s a great list:

  • When a Door Closes Another Opens
  • Gratitude by Mental Elimination
  • Similar Strengths – Group activity
  • Flow Experiences
  • Walking Meditation
  • 3 Positive Things a Day
  • Chasing Happiness

It’s a helpful article with exercises to explore each concept.  The first concept – When one door closes, another one opens – is one I think we’ve all had, and I think most of us would agree that the second door does eventually open, but waiting in the hallway is a drag!

Using these questions to look at that closed door can help:

  1. What led to the door closing? What helped you open the new door?
  2. How long did it take you to realize the new open door?
  3. Was it easy or hard for you to realize the new door open?
  4. What prevented you from seeing the new open door?
  5. What can you do next time to realize the new open door sooner?
  6. What were the effects of the door closing on you? Did it last long?
  7. Did the experience bring anything positive?
  8. Which character strengths did you have to use in this activity?
  9. What does a closed door represent to you now?
  10. What did you learn from the door closing?
  11. Is there more room for growth from these types of experiences?
  12. Is there a closed door that you still wish to see open?

One thing that has helped me during those ‘closed door times’ is the idea of Living Curiously. I recently discovered a wonderful website, ‘Living Curiously Lifestyle.’

The website is by a woman named Becki Saltzman – she and I share the same publicist, Joanne McCall.  One door closing led me to McCall, and what a great new door opening that turned out to be. I really recommend you spend some time exploring Saltzman’s website. It is interesting, fun and she has great boots!

The article in Positive Psychology Program is really wonderful. I suggest using the seven activity exercise for seven days, one a day.

It is thought-provoking and positive-inspiring.

What better way to close than with a clip from the father of positive psychology, Martin Seligman.

I’d love to hear about your experience using the seven positive psychology activities.  And as always, thank you for taking the time to visit.  I appreciate it.